Music of Fire and Water

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Yesterday, after a wonderful lunch with friends from New York City and their cousin, I went to hear a Baroque concert by the Budapest Festival Orchestra with guest conductor Jordi Savall. I think this was my first time walking down the leafy Liszt Ferenc tér; it was certainly my first time at the Zeneakadémia Koncertközpont. But those were minor firsts, relatively speaking; when it came to the music, I was in for surprises of soul.

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Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 4 sounded fresh and alive; I was immediately caught up in it. Then came Rameau’s Les Boréades Suite, which opened up the imagination in new ways. I think I have listened to it before, but not in a long time; my favorite movement was the Contredanse en rondeau, strange and gracious at once. Here’s my favorite of the performances I found online–by Les Ambassadeurs, conducted by Alexis Kossenko–but Savall and the Budapest Festival Orchestra captured something different.

That is what happens in a concert: you become part of a special instantiation of a piece. I was sitting all the way on the left, in the fourth row; this gave me a perfect view of the French horn section (they were playing Baroque horns, I think).

Then Muffat’s Impatientia Suite was sweet perfection: seven movements in about ten minutes. I think the third movement (Canaries) was my favorite, but it’s hard to tell now; each one proceeded like a raindrop on a string. In the last piece of the program, Händel’s Music for the Royal Fireworks, the woodwinds took the concert to still another level of beauty in the first Menuet at the end. Here’s a gorgeous performance by The Academy of Ancient Music, conducted by Christopher Hogwood–but again, it doesn’t sound quite like what I heard yesterday.

Then came three encores! For the first, the orchestra played the first suite of Händel’s Water Music; for the second, the last movement of the Rameau, the Contredanse très vive, with audience participation. Then, for the last one, I think it was the Gavotte I that they played (in honor of the ticking clock). I made it to the train just in time–a hot train, with no open windows, but with a view of rain and crepuscular rays. Fire and water: a fitting end to the day.

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I took the top photo from the train and the second when walking home from the train station and looking back westward.

  • “To know that you can do better next time, unrecognizably better, and that there is no next time, and that it is a blessing there is not, there is a thought to be going on with.”

    —Samuel Beckett, Malone Dies

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  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

     

    Diana Senechal is the author of Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture and the 2011 winner of the Hiett Prize in the Humanities, awarded by the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture. Her second book, Mind over Memes: Passive Listening, Toxic Talk, and Other Modern Language Follies, was published by Rowman & Littlefield in October 2018. In February 2022, Deep Vellum will publish her translation of Gyula Jenei's 2018 poetry collection Mindig Más.

    Since November 2017, she has been teaching English, American civilization, and British civilization at the Varga Katalin Gimnázium in Szolnok, Hungary. From 2011 to 2016, she helped shape and teach the philosophy program at Columbia Secondary School for Math, Science & Engineering in New York City. In 2014, she and her students founded the philosophy journal CONTRARIWISE, which now has international participation and readership. In 2020, at the Varga Katalin Gimnázium, she and her students released the first issue of the online literary journal Folyosó.

  • INTERVIEWS AND TALKS

    On April 26, 2016, Diana Senechal delivered her talk "Take Away the Takeaway (Including This One)" at TEDx Upper West Side.
     

    Here is a video from the Dallas Institute's 2015 Education Forum.  Also see the video "Hiett Prize Winners Discuss the Future of the Humanities." 

    On April 19–21, 2014, Diana Senechal took part in a discussion of solitude on BBC World Service's programme The Forum.  

    On February 22, 2013, Diana Senechal was interviewed by Leah Wescott, editor-in-chief of The Cronk of Higher Education. Here is the podcast.

  • ABOUT THIS BLOG

    All blog contents are copyright © Diana Senechal. Anything on this blog may be quoted with proper attribution. Comments are welcome.

    On this blog, Take Away the Takeaway, I discuss literature, music, education, and other things. Some of the pieces are satirical and assigned (for clarity) to the satire category.

    When I revise a piece substantially after posting it, I note this at the end. Minor corrections (e.g., of punctuation and spelling) may go unannounced.

    Speaking of imperfection, my other blog, Megfogalmazások, abounds with imperfect Hungarian.

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