“Pici koncert” highlights

pozovi menya
The long-awaited “pici koncert“* took place this morning. (“Long-awaited” in this case means “anticipated for two weeks.”) Many students and teachers gathered to listen, out in the hallway, during the long break between the second and third periods. We sang three songs in three languages: “Позови меня” by Любэ, “Maradok ember” by 1LIFE, and “Champs-Elysées” by Joe Dassin. Here is a video of the highlights. (Please note that it is unlisted: that is, viewable only by those who have the link.)

 

Afterwards I was delighted with the concert but disappointed that I hadn’t done better with “Maradok ember” (one of my favorite songs in the world). Its lyrics are by Marcell Bajnai, the lead singer, guitarist, and lyricist of 1LIFE; I hope to read and hear much more of his work over the coming decades. I had wanted to play it perfectly but instead said two words wrong, didn’t pronounce things well overall, didn’t play quite in tune, hit a couple of dud notes, and went a little too fast. “Jaj, emberiség!” (as opposed to “jaj, istenem!”). But later I saw things more clearly: we had set out to do our best and have fun, and we accomplished both. The atmosphere in the hall was upbeat: people listened and applauded heartily. Thanks to everyone who took part–performers, composers, and audience! Thanks also to the 9.AJTP class, whose “pici koncert” earlier in the month inspired this one. And thanks to my colleagues Judit Kéri and Nóra Csiffáryné Fegecs, who taught the songs to their students and helped bring all of this about, and my colleague Anikó Bánhegyesi, who recorded the video.

aux champs elysees

*“Pici” in Hungarian means “tiny.” The concert, like the previous one, was called a “pici koncert a nagy szünetben,” that is, a “tiny concert in the big break.” The “big break” is the fifteen-minute break between the second and third periods.

After posting this piece, I re-edited and re-uploaded the video; the new version (embedded here) fades in and out of each segment.

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  1. No Ordinary Song | Take Away the Takeaway
  2. Thoughts on “Kapcsolj ki” | Take Away the Takeaway

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    Diana Senechal is the author of Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture and the 2011 winner of the Hiett Prize in the Humanities, awarded by the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture. Her second book, Mind over Memes: Passive Listening, Toxic Talk, and Other Modern Language Follies, was published by Rowman & Littlefield in October 2018. In February 2022, Deep Vellum will publish her translation of Gyula Jenei's 2018 poetry collection Mindig Más.

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